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Penn State students make big push to get involved in local politics

Students at Penn State are not normally very involved in local politics, but as the local elections come closer, that's all changing. (WJAC)

STATE COLLEGE - Students at Penn State are not normally very involved in local politics, but as the local elections come closer, that's all changing.

Rylie Cooper is a freshman at the university, and is only 19 years old. She's decided to run for Borough Council.

"I've always been interested in politics, and I think it's important to start young," said Cooper. "It's strange to me that there are so many students living here, but none have representation on the board. I think it's time students get their voices heard within their own government."

On Tuesday, students with the group "BugPac," unveiled a political movement they've been organizing for months, with the same tone.

"We have no power with local politics," said UPUA president, Terry Ford. "We have tried numerous times to advance student priorities, but time and time again we find it's difficult to do when communicating with Borough Council and the major."

Penn State students make up over 70 percent of State College's population and to make an impact they know they need votes from fellow students.

"The percent of students that vote is very low," said Kevin Horne, one of the leaders of BugPac. Although the group is pushing for student involvement, the student group is also supporting like-minded state college community members as well.

If a student is elected, it would be the first time since 1973.

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